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Re: [IGSROBIN] Question: Planting dormant fat-plants


Diana asked:

"I just mailed a request to the International Geranium
Society for the seeds of some succulent pelargoniums
including P. carnosum, along with some erodiums and
monsonias.  Does anyone have any experience with any of
these as far as germinating seed?"

The succulent Pelargoniums would normally be sowed in September and
grown through the winter. However, if your area is either cold and or
the daylight is poor you might want delay sowing until
pringtime( March, say). Your area is certainly cold, so they will be
kept indoors at a temperature minimum of 40F, but preferably higher. You
could grow them through the winter if you can maintain these
temperatures and if your growing area gets good direct light.

If you sow now they will germinate and grow thius summer but with heat
and humidity you are going to have to watch damping off.

Erodiums can be sowed now. They will reach flowering stage by late
summer. I can't answer what will happen the Monsonias if sowed now.

In all cases a soil mix of coarse sand and fine perlite is all you need
to get them germinated. A slight nicking of the seeds will speed
germination. Cover them very lightly with grains of sand, preferably
silica sand so the seedlings show up clearly. Water container from below
until germination has begun - a few weeks for most if nicking is done.
But apply a waek fungicide before sowing to help avoid damping off. Too
much will kill the seedlings.

Good luck!

Andrew
San Diego, California





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