hort.net Seasonal photo, (c) 2006 Christopher P. Lindsey, All Rights Reserved: do not copy
articles | gallery of plants | blog | tech blog | plant profiles | patents | mailing lists | top stories | links | shorturl service | tom clothier's archive0
 Navigation
Articles
Gallery of Plants
Blog
Tech Blog
Plant Profiles
Patents
Mailing Lists
    FAQ
    Netiquette
    Search ALL lists
    Search help
    Subscription info
Top Stories
Links
sHORTurl service
Tom Clothier's Archive
 Top Stories
Disease could hit Britain's trees hard

Ten of the best snowdrop cultivars

Plant protein database helps identify plant gene functions

Dendroclimatologists record history through trees

Potato beetle could be thwarted through gene manipulation

Hawaii expands coffee farm quarantine

Study explains flower petal loss

Unauthorized use of a plant doesn't invalidate it's patent

RSS story archive

Re: [IGSROBIN] Pelargonium seed


Greetings from Sweden!

Pheeeew! Just resurfing....yup for those who are interested ( no yawns
please!) we still have a fair sprinkling of snow, and it is sooo grey and
dull! And it is March!!!

Astrid, I see you have been vitten by the bug. Welcome to Pellie mania
land. There's no known cure! It just gets....hrrmm..better and better all
the time!!!

Some of your pellies operate on a Wintergrowing cycle. However, as we are
still in March I believe you could sow all of your seeds now, even the
Winter grwoing ones. What will happen is that they'll geminate and then in
a short while just go dormant. The alternative is to wait with the
Wintergrowers until Autumn, but I find that practice a bit difficult . It
is easier now than moving into our dark Winters!
I would start by mixing together a nice C&S mix, sand/grit and my fav leca,
not too much. It should be sterile and draining, so use whatever works best
for you, sand/grit & leca works for me, so use whatever works best for you.
( leca is artificially expanded clay spheres, in different sizes, often
used as a building material or in hydroponics).
Remove the parachutes gently, and 'slot' the seed into the compost. Mind
your temperatures as wild pellies won't germinate if temps climb above +20
C.
Keep moist but not wet. When they have germinated, put slightly cooler and
with good ventilation as the succulent pellies aren't too happy in a humid
and stagnant atmosphere.

Of all the ones you mention, I like P incrassatum, P barklyi, P
klinghartense best. Tuberous rooted ones, forming a small caudex in their
first year, and with fascinating small flowers, P incrassatum is
spectacular in flower, and is a groundhugging silvery foliaged plant.
Winter grower.
P barklyi has nicely veined dark green leaves whcih are purple underneath.
So neat! Summergrower for me, or irregular to be exact.
P klinghartense is another tuberous rooted one, forms a small caudex and is
also slowgrowing, but oh so interesting!

Now I ran out of breath! Best of luck from Ingrid in Sweden!





 © 1995-2015 Mallorn Computing, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
Our Privacy Statement
Other Mailing lists | Author Index | Date Index | Subject Index | Thread Index