Re: [IGS] Sarcs


Andrew Wilson wrote:
> Dear All,
> Glad to say that a Sarcocaulon crassicaule has just flowered for me. I got
> it as a small plant last summer, grew it outdoors all winter and it is now
> in bloom. My question is - do I now let it go dormant this summer as it
> would in nature or, as it is in a container, should I keep it watered? Or
> should I just plant it out? As you can see I am new to growing Sarcs.
> San Diego, California
> awilson@fda.net

Hi Andrew,
I have an approximately 7 year old Sarcocaulon vanderietiae (flowers
with lovely white symmetrical flowers from july to september in Holland,
just miniature white silk handkerchiefs!) that I keep rather dry from
october to april. The plant is potted in a clay type firm solid compost
(recommendation from the botanical garden I bought it from) and not
repotted much. Allthough after flowering most of the leaves fell off,
not all did (as I was told by another Sarcocaulon owner it would drop
all) and now it gets new leaves again. Preventing rot is important I
feel so that is why I feel most comfortable to keep it fairly dry in
winter (and living in a moderate climate country I of course keep it
inside during winters - first in the gazebo and now it will be in the
new nursery). It has a lovely "bonsai" form since it tends to spread out
its branches rather horizontally so when it is in full bloom it of
course is inside in the living room. Am sure yours will grow wonderful
when planted in the full ground outside!
I have a question how ever - I saved some seeds and know I have to use
the "wet" method with them (soaking them for a day) but is it possible
to root cuttings and how should I proceed - cut and let them dry for
some days (succulent method) and in what kind of soil should I put the
cutting - since it is such a slow grower I did not want to cut anything
yet, but now I feel I could try to do so.
Any clues out there?
--
Mimy Sluiter
<http://www.catsunited.com/members/textpage/moirawin.html>
mailto:manx1@wxs.nl
(Dagny - a Sarcocaulon is a succulent with woody stems with thorns and
nice small leathery leaves and the flowers are miniature versions of the
hardy Geraniums you have in such abundance outside in the woods in
Sweden!)



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