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Re: Gnats

  • Subject: Re: Gnats
  • From: Claire Peplowski ECPep@AOL.COM
  • Date: Fri, 15 Nov 2002 12:02:03 EST

In a message dated 11/15/02 12:34:27 AM Eastern Standard Time,
sandyc@SURFARI.NET writes:


> As I recall, I did try the drenches with Bt as well.  I was stupid of me
> to bring it inside in the first place.

Sandy,

The BT drenches have to be the correct form.  The vegetable garden
formulation does not work on fungus gnats.  Israelensis, the spelling
differing where you look, is the one.  I have no fungus gnat activity just
now, it seems to come with new plants.  You can also spray the surface of the
plant with malathion.  If using any scented leaf plant in cooking, I would
not do this plus it needs to be done outdoors.

I am not opposed to chemical use as a treatment on one plant.  I would not
agree to wholesale spraying of the greenhouse or large parts of the garden.

I belong to a group that swears by Listerine which I did not find useful but
pass it along in case there are folks who are opposed to chemical solutions.
If you are in the plant area frequently and see the adults flying about,
Schultz spray which is pyrethrum, sprayed around while they are active will
over time reduce the populations a great deal.

Indoor growing requires vigilance.

Claire Peplowski
NYS z4





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