hort.net Seasonal photo, (c) 2006 Christopher P. Lindsey, All Rights Reserved: do not copy
articles | gallery of plants | blog | tech blog | plant profiles | patents | mailing lists | top stories | links | shorturl service | tom clothier's archive0
 Navigation
Articles
Gallery of Plants
Blog
Tech Blog
Plant Profiles
Patents
Mailing Lists
    FAQ
    Netiquette
    Search ALL lists
    Search help
    Subscription info
Top Stories
Links
sHORTurl service
Tom Clothier's Archive
 Top Stories
Disease could hit Britain's trees hard

Ten of the best snowdrop cultivars

Plant protein database helps identify plant gene functions

Dendroclimatologists record history through trees

Potato beetle could be thwarted through gene manipulation

Hawaii expands coffee farm quarantine

Study explains flower petal loss

Unauthorized use of a plant doesn't invalidate it's patent

RSS story archive

Re: Bringing plants inside


Ronald and all,

If I remember correctly plants give oxygen in the day and Carbon Dioxide at
night - or is it the other way round? It might matter if you are sleeping in
the room and it's CO2 during the night.
Unless your house is very well draught-proofed and you never open a door or
window the plants should be all right (and you too, lol). Make sure the
plants and cuttings get enough light during the winter, windows don't let in
the make compared to their summer quarters.

We've had an unusually mild time recently so the frost warning for last
night caught me unawares, as usual. Unfortunately the mildness can with a
lot of rain and constantly damp weather. The grass loves it and is still
growing rapidly. If only it would dry out enough for me to get out with the
mower.

The mountains of Northwest Wales are not the best place to grow
pelargoniums. Apart from the damp we cannot rules out three days of constant
gale force (or worse) winds at any time of year and that can put back the
growth on plants back 5 weeks overnight. So most of my plants are in a
greenhouse which always feels far too small and glass sided shed. So the
frost protection is more a matter of getting better organised and bringing
all my frost sensitive genera into the area that is heated, when necessary.

Well there was not frost and the sun is even shining today.

I hope your plants are all tucked up warm Ingrid. Are they in a greenhouse
over the winter or do you bring them into your home?

Brrr.  David





 © 1995-2015 Mallorn Computing, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
Our Privacy Statement
Other Mailing lists | Author Index | Date Index | Subject Index | Thread Index