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Re: Bonanza Nursery

  • Subject: Re: Bonanza Nursery
  • From: Barry Roth <barry_roth@YAHOO.COM>
  • Date: Wed, 29 Sep 2004 15:22:55 -0700

I should remember the dates, but all I can tell you is that the two editions
(or "first two," if there were ever more than two) were produced in my office
as a favor to Gino Franco, a really great guy who was trying hard to make a go
with a geranium nursery in the early 1970's.

Gino provided me with manuscript of the text he wanted, and I was able to
bootleg the secretarial help to produce the hard copy originals that Gino then
took to a print shop for reproduction by offset.  The second edition, at least,
was typed on an IBM "Executive" typewriter, which produced proportionally
spaced text (some letters wider than others).  I hadn't thought of this for
years until the issue of proportional spacing came up in connection with CBS
News and the apparently bogus George Bush/National Guard memos.

My strong impression is that Gino's sources of information were mainly other
catalogs and books like "The Joy of Geraniums," and that except for a few
descriptions of plants and flowers, he added little in the way of original
data.  It would be interesting to see what Kerrigan cultivars he was selling at
the time.

Gino was the first person I knew who imported cuttings from overseas (Parrett,
in England, was one source, for dwarf zonals).  This was after the second
catalog was issued.  I'm not sure he was ever able to propagate enough of his
imports to offer them for sale.  He described to me how the material (unrooted
cuttings) arrived much the worse for travel and the emergency steps he took --
such as cutting back to tiny, uninfected tips and staking them in media with
toothpicks -- to try to get some to survive.


--- Sandy Connerley <sandy_connerley@SBCGLOBAL.NET> wrote:

> Hi Barry and all,
> Do you know how many years Bonanza Nursery in San Jose, California or other
> locations in California, produced a catalog?  Does anybody have any of them?
> Looking for some information on old Kerrigan cultivars.
> Sandy

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