hort.net Seasonal photo, (c) 2006 Christopher P. Lindsey, All Rights Reserved: do not copy
articles | gallery of plants | blog | tech blog | plant profiles | patents | mailing lists | top stories | links | shorturl service | tom clothier's archive0
 Navigation
Articles
Gallery of Plants
Blog
Tech Blog
Plant Profiles
Patents
Mailing Lists
    FAQ
    Netiquette
    Search ALL lists
    Search help
    Subscription info
Top Stories
Links
sHORTurl service
Tom Clothier's Archive
 Top Stories
Disease could hit Britain's trees hard

Ten of the best snowdrop cultivars

Plant protein database helps identify plant gene functions

Dendroclimatologists record history through trees

Potato beetle could be thwarted through gene manipulation

Hawaii expands coffee farm quarantine

Study explains flower petal loss

Unauthorized use of a plant doesn't invalidate it's patent

RSS story archive

Re: Moonraker

  • Subject: Re: [iris-photos] Moonraker
  • From: "Patrick Orr" <PatrickJOrr@hotmail.com>
  • Date: Mon, 8 Apr 2002 00:06:02 -0700

Hi Colleen,
 
Yes, unfortunately everything seems to be a more intense color elsewhere than the Southwest. A couple years ago I was told by an Oregon hybridizer that he was shocked by how much the color on his introductions were "bleached out" here in our area.  Also last year, a visiting hybridizer was dismayed by how yukky a color one of his introductions were out here as opposed to his california location.  It had a sort of muddy look to it here where it is an intense golden honey look back home.
 
It is a sad sorted affair, but they are still pretty in our eyes.  We know no different until we see them grown elsewhere. 
 
It kinda makes me excited though, because it tells me that when I hybridize something in my garden that I think is really pretty, it will be EVEN MORE pretty when grown elsewhere. 
 
There was nothing wrong with the substance on this bloom however.  Photos can be deceiving in that regard.  I never judge substance by a photograph for this reason.  The right edge in the photograph DOES look papery, but I think it may have been shadows that cause that look.  The petal was fresh and firm when I took the picture, no paperyness in the flower at all.  It really was as you say, lovely and crisp in person. 
 
Hmmm...
 
You and others really have a good eye.  I never noticed a lot of things on my photos until others have written to me about them. 
 
Either that, or you are all too darned picky...lol.
 
Patrick 
 
----- Original Message -----
From: Colleen Modra
Sent: Sunday, April 07, 2002 11:30 PM
To: iris-photos@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [iris-photos] Moonraker
 
Hi Patrick
Interested in your Moonraker photo. For me Moonraker  is a much more intense
yellow with less white area on the falls, lovely crisp substance and form.

Colleen Modra
Adelaide Hills
South Australia
zone 8/9
irises@senet.com.au


----- Original Message -----
From: Patrick Orr <PatrickJOrr@hotmail.com>
To: IRIS PHOTOS <iris-photos@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Monday, April 08, 2002 4:04 PM
Subject: [iris-photos] Moonraker


Moonraker
TB
Sutton '97

Patrick Orr
Member:AIS,TBIS,RIS,SDIS,SCIS,TAIS
Phoenix Zone 9
patrickjorr@hotmail.comGet more from the Web.  FREE MSN Explorer download :
http://explorer.msn.com




Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.

Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
ADVERTISEMENT

Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


Get more from the Web. FREE MSN Explorer download : http://explorer.msn.com





 © 1995-2015 Mallorn Computing, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
Our Privacy Statement
Other Mailing lists | Author Index | Date Index | Subject Index | Thread Index