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Re: i. Albicans?

  • Subject: [PHOTO] Re: [iris-photos] i. Albicans?
  • From: Mickey Corley <mcorley@compuserve.com>
  • Date: Mon, 5 Apr 2004 10:41:15 -0400

  Last year I retrieved iris from a Cemetery that I'm involved in
restoring.  1st burial 1856 - last burial 1921 - there has been no upkeep
of the grounds since then.  I was expecting to have the old purple flags I
remembered as a child.  Imagine my surprise, when the buds looked light
blue - I couldn't think of an old iris that was blue.  Of 13 rhizomes, I've
got 4 that are blooming and they are pure white with no hint of blue after
blooming.  

This is one of the times I've read messages I had no idea I might use the
information in and was glad I had kept them all as they were extremely
informative.  Thanks Colleen for asking the question.

 All of the iris at the cemetery in Fannin County Texas are in bloom and
are all the same kind.  I looked at the images on HIPS and compared them
with the ones Dave Ferguson & Bill Burleson sent and think they are the
same

This is the earliest iris other than Eleanor Roosevelt I have bloom and
bloomed at the same time as my SDB clumps did.  

I have a problem though with Dave's description 
>  'Albicans' usually has short branches on the flowering stalk and the
flowers are held close to the top of the ovary.  

Mine have short branches but the flowers are 1 1/4 inch from the ovary.

Dave also said:
> There are prominent hairs on the narrowed base of the standards in
'Florentina' but not on those of 'Albicans'.

Mine definitely do not have hairs on the base of the standards.

I think this flower is albican but would like your input.

Mickey Corley (Mrs.)
Bethany OK - Center of Oklahoma USA
Zone 6/7


Message text written by INTERNET:iris-photos@yahoogroups.com - 3/30/2004
>Could anyone one give me an exact Description of the differences between i
albicans and I florentina.

Colleen Modra<

Message text written by INTERNET:iris-photos@yahoogroups.com - 3/31/2004
At least this post points to photos even if it doesn't have them....Neil
Mogensen

Message text written by INTERNET:iris-photos@yahoogroups.com - 4/1/2004
'Albicans' has moderately wide leaves, and the fan looks a bit "wavy",
while the leaves of 'Florentina' are narrower and the fan is flatter. 
'Albicans' usually has short branches on the flowering stalk and the
flowers are held close to the top of the ovary.  The bracts are somewhat
rounded and inflated looking, and green with a sharply defined papery
margin at the top edge.  They don't look blue in my garden at all, but
clean white with a bit of yellow.
'Florentina' comes on about a week or two later, seems to average a bit
taller, and the flower looks a bit more "slender" and "stretched out". 
They are held above the bracts on a longer tube, and the bracts are more
papery when the flowers open (but still green when still in bud, and toward
the base when the flowers are open).  For me the buds are light blue before
the flower opens, and the flowers have a bluish tinge.  There are prominent
hairs on the narrowed base of the standards in 'Florentina' but not on
those of 'Albicans'.

David Ferguson


Message text written by INTERNET:iris-photos@yahoogroups.com - 4/1/2004
I looked closely at the Albicans buds, and there is perhaps a very very
very faint tint of blue in them if the sun hits them just right (but it
looks more like a touch of gray).  It is so faint that it could just be my
imagination!  I can see no trace of blue in open flowers at all.

David Ferguson

Message text written by INTERNET:iris-photos@yahoogroups.com - 4/1/2004
Your memory is correct. This is a typical albicans stalk and foliage here.

Smiles,
Bill Burleson 

Message text written by INTERNET:iris-photos@yahoogroups.com - 4/1/2004
My albicans never "stretch out" that much.  The tube on the flower is much
longer on yours than it ever gets on mine.  I suspect that this has a lot
to do with climate and growing conditions.  It is definitely the same plant
though.

Dave


 
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