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AB: sdlg ((New Moon x Luella Dee) x Shalom)
iris-photos@yahoogroups.com
  • Subject: AB: sdlg ((New Moon x Luella Dee) x Shalom)
  • From: Donald Eaves <donald@txol.net>
  • Date: Sun, 01 Apr 2012 13:25:52 -0500

 

Now that the AB bloom is winding down, I'm evaluating what happened,
what's new, where the pods happened. This was one of the new seedlings
derived using a parent with an unbalanced set of chromosomes. I've put
a lot of effort into getting those to produce plants and the results are
interesting, but frustrating. The quarterbred pod parent of this one
looks essentially like a TB, but this result looks more like a halfbred
AB. That has been the trend when I can grow one and get it to bloom.
But that's been a source of frustration. The trend for those plants is
to be stingy with increase, slow to reach maiden bloom and slow to
recover from bloom on too many fans too soon and not to produce pollen.
Generally ABs, including quarterbreds (or OGB- types) have strong
increase, so that's been a surprise. The OGB- (quarterbred type) tend
to not have pollen or set pods readily. They also tend not to have a
strong look harking back to the aril ancestors. These pick back up the
look, but still no pollen, poor increase, but - and this is a major
thing - are infinitely more agreeable about setting pods. This plant
has five if some don't prove to be balloons. Didn't really like this
one. Too many problems. Snaky stalk, crumpled blooms that remind me of
my shirts when I forget to take them out of the dryer. Brilliant colors
I didn't expect though. Much more intense than the photo indicates. I
figured on getting a yellow, not this. The colors were so saturated
they reminded me of those cheap garden catalog photos where the colors
are so artificial they are unbelievable. I actually prefer the toned
down look of the photo than what the reality was. Still this plant
should have one chromosome contributed from New Moon. A known bit of TB
material in an AB. So if the seeds germinate, I'll see what another
generation yields.

Donald Eaves
donald@txol.net
Texas Zone 7 90F plus today, USA

JPEG image



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