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RE: CULT: year round food
iris-photos@yahoogroups.com
  • Subject: RE: CULT: year round food
  • From: "karl becker" <kbecker95@wi.rr.com>
  • Date: Sun, 30 Jan 2011 22:23:51 -0600

 

Tri and plant 1 or 2 crown imperial in the most infected area or plant some garlic that keeps most of the critters out it is worth a try

 

From: iris-photos@yahoogroups.com [mailto:iris-photos@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of J. Griffin Crump
Sent: Sunday, January 30, 2011 9:48 PM
To: iris-photos@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [iris-photos] CULT: year round food

 

 

Heck, Donald  --  I’m sorry for your loss.  Hope you solve the problem and beat it.  --  Griff

 

Sent: Sunday, January 30, 2011 8:26 PM

!

Subject: [iris-photos] CULT: year round food

 

 

In summer and fall it's grasshoppers. In winter and spring when it's dry
it's something else. Not totally sure who the culpret is, but I strongly
suspect field rats. They were the cause year before last when it had been
dry and there was nothing green in the winter months. When I finally caught
one in a trap it was as large as a tree squirrel. At least so far they
aren't eating all the wiring they can find. It's not mice because a wire
basket is enough to prevent further damage and they would have no trouble
getting inside the wires. Not deer or I'd have seen the tracks. Might be
cottontails, but they hang around in the iris beds year round and don't
damage them. Also the dogs live and dream about chasing them. The damage
is way to widespread for them to have overlooked rabbits for that long.
Whole areas of the iris look like they've had a weedeater taken to them -
and a ragged job of it at that. Every day there is more damage. Can't win.
Beds that were filled up with oak leaves promptly get eaten when they are
cleared. This was a seedling from last year. That group hasn't had any
breaks at all from the time they were planted. Probably will have to wait
another year to see much bloom from them.

Donald Eaves
mailto:donald%40eastland.net
Texas Zone 7b, USA

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JPEG image



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