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family stripes for Dave

  • Subject: [PHOTO] [iris-photos] family stripes for Dave
  • From: "Donald Eaves" <donald@eastland.net>
  • Date: Wed, 28 Jul 2004 21:04:08 -0500

Sorry this is so big, but reducing it too much lost the striping detail.
Top row from left is WEBSPUN, SCARLET BUTTERFLY, STRIPED BUTTERFLY.
Bottom row from left is OLIVE ORCHID, RED BUTTERFLY, GOLD OF OPHIR.

WEBSPUN is from two seedlings with STRIPED BUTTERFLY as one of the parents:
(Riptide x Striped Butterfly) X (Striped Butterfly x Tollgate).  The next
four have 'Butterfly Wings' as the registered pod parent but with different
TB pollen parents, so they are all half siblings.  GOLD OF OPHIR has unknown
parentage, but was originally billed as a Eupogocyclus hybrid.  I include it
here because it has the same effect as the others.  These are relatively
small flowered TB types with reasonably good branching.  The garden effect
is mindful of MTBs in a larger version.  I grow the ancestor of the first
five, but my own photos this year of 'Butterfly Wings' were so dismal they
were promptly deleted.  Roberto Maruccho posted a good photo that can be
found in the hort.net archives of May 2003.  These do form a group among the
many irises I grow.  They share growth habits, form and size.  All have
better substance than I expected.  And, to some extent or another, they all
have striping, veining or whatever you want to call it.

Donald Eaves
donald@eastland.net
Texas Zone 7b, USA


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