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Re: Storing rhizomes?

  • Subject: Re: [iris-photos] Storing rhizomes?
  • From: "Harold Peters" <harold@directcon.net>
  • Date: Sun, 27 May 2001 12:18:15 -0700

Moving across the yard can be done entirely differently than across the
county. You can dig the clump with a lot of soil and just set the clump and
dirt in a shady place until you are ready to replant. Depending on a number
of conditions, the clump can be left that way for up to a couple of months.
I recommend removing most of the old soil just before planting the clump
into the new location.

There was a study done years ago. Different types (kinds) of irises were
planted in rows and left for 5 years. The irises were then dug and replanted
in rows that were at right angles to the original planting. Everywhere a
type of iris was planted back where that type had been originally, the
plants were stunted compared to the others in the same row. The are three
most probably explanations: the plants had exhausted some mirconutrient, the
plant had excreated some chemical toxic to the host or the microbiological
balance had become adverse to the plant. The explanations are not mutually
exclusive and could all be part of the explanation. Whatever the reason,
transferring lots of soil from an old bed to a  new bed may be transferring
the reason for the poorer performance.

Harold Peters
Beautiful View Iris Garden
2048 Hickok Road
El Dorado Hills, CA 95762
harold@directcon.net  www.beautiful-view-iris.com
----- Original Message -----
From: "Cheryl Leigh Chamberlin" <clc@cherylleigh.com>
To: <iris-photos@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, May 27, 2001 10:16 AM
Subject: Re: [iris-photos] Storing rhizomes?


> I'm not Deb <G> but thanks very much for that info. I had the same
question,
> though my irises might only move across the yard, not across the country!
>
> Cheryl Leigh
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Harold Peters" <harold@directcon.net>
> To: <iris-photos@yahoogroups.com>
> Sent: Sunday, May 27, 2001 1:07 PM
> Subject: Re: [iris-photos] Storing rhizomes?
>
>
> The answer is yes, rhizomes can be stored for awhile. The length and
storage
> conditions vary depending on what type of iris is involved. If the
rhizomes
> are TBs. Storage is best when cool, dark and DRY. I have replanted
rhizomes
> out of the ground for 1 year with 90+% success. Soak for 12 to 24 hours,
cut
> old roots as short as possible and then "mud in" to plant.  Planting needs
> to be a minimum of 4 weeks before frost and since no one knows when the
> first frost will be, it can be somewhat of a gamble. Potting can work to
> extend the planting time if there is a way to overwinter the pots.
>
> Harold Peters
> Beautiful View Iris Garden
> 2048 Hickok Road
> El Dorado Hills, CA 95762
> harold@directcon.net  www.beautiful-view-iris.com
>   ----- Original Message -----
>   From: Deb Barone
>   To: iris-photos@yahoogroups.com
>   Sent: Sunday, May 27, 2001 9:42 AM
>   Subject: [iris-photos] Storing rhizomes?
>
>
>   Is it possible to store rhizomes? It's just become possible that we'll
be
> moving cross-country later this summer, and I'd hate to leave my new order
> planted in a garden here. My order won't be ready until late July, or
early
> August.
>
>   I could pot them as well.. but it would be easier for transport to have
> them bagged and/or boxed, I think.
>
>   Anyone know if they'll be alright this way? How long, if at all, can
they
> take being out of the ground? How late is too late to plant in the
> Batlimore/DC area?
>
>   Thanks for advice to this Iris newbie!
>   Deb
>
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>


 

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