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Re: Historic: FROST AND FLAME - form history

  • Subject: Re: [iris-photos] Historic: FROST AND FLAME - form history
  • From: Bill & Gale Wells wells@train.missouri.org
  • Date: Fri, 30 May 2003 16:09:22 -0500

Elm,

I've not seen FAF in person. In your pic, the falls look quite round indeed. That strikes me as unusual in an iris of the 50's, but I don't really know my form history.

Could some of you HIPS folks give me an abbreviated primer on form history? I'd like to get a rough timeline in my head of when various forms appeared. I refer to my older stuff (falls) as "skinny and droopy" while my newer stuff is much broader or wider, rounded, sometimes more horizontal , almost flared. When did that major change take place? (I know, of course, that it didn't happen overnight or in one cultivar -that rather it was a process by many hybridizers, but how long did it take and what were the breakthroughs?) I assume there were similar trends with standards - open, closed, domed, etc. And then, of course, there are those hideous abominations - SAs with their disgusting deformities (Please don't respond with either frost or flames... ;-)  I can't help it if I think they're ugly!)

Bill Wells (southern MO)





Elmsterj@aol.com wrote:
FROST AND FLAME (David Hall, 1956).....I have always loved this quiet, stunning beauty!.....Elm

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