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Re: HYB: IRIS DEVELOPMENT: WHY DONT WE USE OTHER PLANT POLLE

  • Subject: [iris-photos] Re: HYB: IRIS DEVELOPMENT: WHY DONT WE USE OTHER PLANT POLLE
  • From: Linda Mann lmann@volfirst.net
  • Date: Mon, 15 May 2006 08:32:51 -0400

Keith - to answer your question first - plants have to have a <lot> of
duplicate information in their chromosomes or they can't pair up, so
mixing two <totally> different species isn't possible.  Some genes can
be moved from one species to the other in the laboratory, but in nature
(or the hybridizer's garden), the two species have to be closely related
(i.e., share nearly all the same genetic material) before they can
combine and survive.

The more different they are, the less likely they can get together.
Plants and people share <some> of the same genetic material, but they
don't produce offspring together.  At least not outside the
movies...Same goes for pine trees and irises.  Even within closely
related members of the iris family, successful breeding is very limited.

I'm afraid you misunderstood the original post by Paul Hill.  The name
of the iris in the photo isn't STRANGE BREW (although there is an iris
with that name).  And Paul wasn't referring to the pine pollen as part
of the "strange brew" - he was referring to the broken color of the
bloom.  His comment about the pollen was just an aside in case anybody
thought his flower was covered with dirt <g>  He may have been
"bragging" about how bad the pine pollen in the air was at the time.

<It was not my iris Gerry but someone elses who indicated it was the
Pine pollen that , got into the iris. I am novice and do not know about
such things.  To those Iris experienced developres Is mixing different
pollen with irises possible
                    as was suspected by the one iris developer who
contributed "strange Brew"?>

--
Linda Mann east Tennessee USA zone 7/8
East Tennessee Iris Society <http://www.korrnet.org/etis>
American Iris Society web site <http://www.irises.org>
talk archives: <http://www.hort.net/lists/iris-talk/>
photos archives: <http://www.hort.net/lists/iris-photos/>
online R&I <http://www.irisregister.com>





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