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Re: REB: Little T - and MT X Star Dock, pollen
  • Subject: Re: REB: Little T - and MT X Star Dock, pollen
  • From: Linda Mann <lmann@lock-net.com>
  • Date: Sun, 07 Oct 2012 10:59:02 -0400


IMM never made pollen in spring here, but it routinely does when it
blooms other times of year. & does make spring pollen elsewhere, at
least some of the time. i.e., Betty in KY.

I've always assumed the lack of viable spring pollen is an inherited
sensitivity to erratic winter weather. I see the same, tho sometimes
less pronounced, in other cultivars. So far, I've not been able to get
IMM in a pot to put up a bloom stalk, but other cultivars that are
potted and brought indoors to avoid late freezes manage viable pollen
and are more pod fertile than their counterparts out in the open field.

Maybe half? or less? of the IMM cross seedlings make pollen ok. All of
the 10+ seedlings I've kept from about 50 survivors of IMM X Csong
can/often make viable pollen in the field.

The cultivars/seedlings that <do> make viable pollen are also usually
more pod fertile than their counterparts that don't make pollen.

"little T" got its garden name from another weather sensitive trait it
has - miniature stalks in hot dry spring in my gravel soil. drought

Sooo, all of that adds up to my not being terribly excited about trying
to freeze pollen - I want to get away from those climate sensitive genes.

If "little T" will make some pollen with protection, I will use it.

After I see what the "little T" X POP IDOL seedlings look like re:
pollen production & form to decide how much trouble I want to go to with
it, & might try the freezing route again. Waited too long this time tho
- only 4 buds and the last one opened a day or so ago.

Yes, I do freeze whole anthers. Not ok? I've tried drying them for a
day, & not drying them at all, then putting in paper (sticky label)
envelopes, paperclipping shut, loosely folding them in plastic sandwich
baggies, then sealing the baggies in bigger ziplocks with powdered milk.
Bringing them to room temperature (so they won't condense moisture)
before using.

Also tried putting them in little snap top plastic paint containers
inside ziplock bag of milk.

The problem may not be the pollen - pod fertility comes and goes here in
the spring, depending on weather and mysteries of life. If plants are
stressed, it can be quite low for much of the spring. & since I
haven't stored tons of pollen in separate containers, I may just be
missing the right opportunities.

I have the same definition of killing freeze ;-) Just found another
maiden 2011 pod seedling starting a stalk that may not have time to make
it - (IMM X (IMM x '4:the cream weed': (IMM x Csong)).

Impressive bloom on your baby! Nice.

> I asked about collecting pollen because the few seedlings out of
> Immortality I've seen had little or no pollen in spring. I wouldn't
> have thought that would be an inherited trait, but maybe so,
> especially from pod side.
> I don't understand why you have trouble storing pollen, unless
> you take whole anthers, with moisture in them.
> BTW - It's a tie. Second stalk on MT X Stardock came in at 44"
> and terminal not open yet. 3rd frost stopped progression of top
> growth temporarily. My definition of killing freeze is when the
> tomatoes die, which may happen Sun night.
> Mary Lou, near Indianapolis, Z5

Linda Mann east TN zone 7b USA

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