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Re: RE: Cult Over Wintering

On Wed, 23 Apr 2003 08:50:21 -0400, you wrote:

>The survival of plants left lying on the ground over winter is one I can confirm. The ones left in a pile or individually on ground right beside planted ones, survive well well planted ones rot. This seems to have to do with straight physics, expansion and contraction with temperature.   Is the early spring the sun shines on the back of planted rhizomes and heats them up while the bottom of the rhizome is in the frozen ground. Heat expands, cold contracts. This results in cracks in skin and in comes the bacteria. This also happens in fall as weather is getting colder but still can be sunny days. The plants left lying in the open gets an even temperature and thus no cracks.
>One solution is to provide mulch over winter. Also I have been planting the rhizomes deeper and this seems to help overwinter plants, allthough this is not a scientific experiment. Keith  Keppel also plants his rhizomes with several inches odf soil over the top and they certainly do well for him.
>I have planted rhizomes left out of ground over winter and they do bloom. Althought later then the others and much shorter.

I've thrown iris 'out' into the woods and had them survive, but my
husband said that my son came back afterwards and planted them.

I always mulched mine when I lived in RI.  In those days I got pine
needles from the forest area behind the house where I observed that
nothing grew.

And actually my husband still does.  But they aren't irises that I
care desperately about.  OTOH, they seem to do fine with mulch and
even a couple of inches of soil over the top in Maryland.  Bob runs
the leaves from the lawn that we've left lying there over the winter
through a mulcher and shoots the result into the flower beds.
Rosalie Beasley in southern MD

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