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Re: RE: Cult-Botrytis

> I see botrytis in the spring, usually after the plant has fully died.  95%
of plant with it are new plants that are large and juicy  and from  Oregon.

> Chuck Chapman, Guelph, Ontario, Canada. Zone 4/5

I don't agree with Chuck here. I receive rhizomes mostly from Oregon. At
least largest of them from Mid-America are healtiest. Some years ago they
had those problems as Schreiners but there is significant progress now.

> It may be a combination effect. Large rhizomes planted traditionally, have
teir backs exposed to the air. In colder climates you typically will get
some warm sunny days (in late fall and in mid-winter and late winter) while
ground is still frozen. This means back of rhizomes are warm and base is
cold. The warm parats expand and the bottoms dont. This will result in many
microfractures in surface of rhizome, particularly at soil line. These
microfractures leave openings for entrance of disease entities such as

Don't agree again.
I noticed many times that botrytis starts on newly planted rhizomes during
cold fall. Botrytis starts from inner parts of green leaves and expands then
to rhizome, (sometimes it starts from the cut on the back of rhizome). Often
only one method to save rhizome alive is to cut off all green leaves and
primordia of terminal fan.

in Moscow

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