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Re: HYB: Rot and Seedling Selection


In a message dated 4/6/2005 11:19:22 AM Central Daylight Time, 
DFerguson@cabq.gov writes:


>   However, while I can
> grow them fairly well here, they have a tendency to melt in summer,
> especially if they get wet crowns when it is hot (most of our little rain
> comes as summer afternoon thunderstorms - can be devastating).  

Good Dave,
We often overlook plant's needs for consistency in their enviorenment. Their 
brains work a little slower than anything except maybe a Southerners speach 
while talkin'.

One almost certain way to induce crown rot in a daylily is to grow it in 
consistently moist conditions for a bloom cycle, then let the soil dry out until 
the plant heads for dormancy. Then, overhead water. Plants are slow thinkers.

Irises will grow quite well in pleasingly moist conditions. They too, think 
slow and do not adapt well to rapid changes in the enviorenmental conditions to 
which they have acclimated themselves. I think this to some degree accounts 
for the relatively high death rates among new plantings of purchased rhizomes 
from what can be a vastly different climates.

Then too, I suspect the plant's slow brain is the reason God invented days 
that change in length a little at a time and rain that comes gently and 
consistently here. I also am just as certain He invented thunder so He could holler 
real loud at Southerns to roll up their car windows.

Smilin' cause it's rainin' here.
Bill Burleson

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