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Re: SPEC:Pseudacorus-An appreciation


Bill Shear wrote:
"What's the evidence for pseudacorus being aggressive and crowding out
 native plants?"

This is an interesting question.  It is listed as an invasive species in
a number of states and provinces in North America.  I attend a lot of
meetings on invasives (5 in Washington last week) and always use
pseudocorus as an example.  I have been told by someone at the MASS
meeting that it is definitely invasive in water polluted with
agricultural fertilizers in the Chicago area.  There is also an account
of it being invasive in a small nature reserve in SE British Columbia. 
Other than that, I can not find anyone who can document reasons why it
is included on the invasive lists.

Another question on the same species.  Most of the pseudocorus that I
have seen have the flowers located about half to 2/3rds of the way up
the leaves.  In the "Realm of the Russian Bear" book, page 49, there is
a beautiful picture of beds of this species in the Volga delta.  All the
flowers are raised above the vegetation.  Any explanation?

Ian

Ottawa - where the snow still covers the ground although there is a
small patch of ground showing and one or two iris plants have appeared.





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