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Re: moving iris question



> Sharon A. Ruck wrote:

>> I have a question for all the experts.  We plan to move to NE
Washington
>> next april or may, and wonder, how do we move the irises? 

And Rick answered:

> Sharon,

> Probably the easiest solution to moving your iris would be bare
root. 
> Dig the iris a few days before the move and let them dry.  

Sharon,

This is good advice for your BEARDED iris.  However beardless iris
(your LAs for example) cannot be allowed to dry out.  For the LAs I'd
suggest potting them up in a light mix (pine bark with 1/3 sand will
work) anytime after this years bloom and before your move.  Keep the
pots moist, and feed regularly.  

Rodney Barton
rbarton@hsc.unt.edu
Hickory Creek, (North Central) Texas, USA
Zone 7/8, typical temp range 15 - 105 F (-9 - 41 C)
AIS, SIGNA, SPCNI, SLI, FWIS, Iris-L

North American Native Iris Web Page:
http://molly.hsc.unt.edu/~rbarton/Iris/NANI.html





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