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Re: AB: FIRST BLOOM

  • To: Multiple recipients of list <iris-l@rt66.com>
  • Subject: Re: AB: FIRST BLOOM
  • From: "J. Griffin Crump" <jgcrump@erols.com>
  • Date: Sat, 5 Apr 1997 18:00:52 -0700 (MST)

CEMahan@aol.com wrote:
> 
> Today my first beardless iris bloomed.  It is the tiny Evansia species native
> to the Great Lakes region Iris lacustris. Only about 2 inches tall.
>  Charming.   Clarence Mahan in VA

Clarence -- How different our bloom season, and less than 30 miles
apart!
I have three TBs with bloomstalks a foot or more tall. One is
OPPORTUNITY; another is a seedling of lost origin; the third is a
seedling of LATIN LADY by the aforementioned seedling. At this rate, if
I have anything to show, it will have to be at the Region 4 meeting.

Interestingly, my seedling gardens and older plants at home are full of
incipient bloom stalks. My seedling garden about four miles distant,
below Mount Vernon, isn't showing any bloom stalks yet. These are the
survivors of last year's devastating winter. They have come through this
winter in excellent shape, but, as noted, are lagging behind my home
irises. Another difference: I fed the home irises a copious banquet of
alfalfa soup (i.e., unstrained) three weeks ago, whereas the seedlings
below Mount Vernon have had to go without, due to the county not having
turned on the water at my leased plot. Hmmm.

Griff Crump, along the too-warm tidal Potomac near Mount Vernon, VA





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