hort.net Seasonal photo, (c) 2006 Christopher P. Lindsey, All Rights Reserved: do not copy
articles | gallery of plants | blog | tech blog | plant profiles | patents | mailing lists | top stories | links | shorturl service | tom clothier's archive0
 Navigation
Articles
Gallery of Plants
Blog
Tech Blog
Plant Profiles
Patents
Mailing Lists
    FAQ
    Netiquette
    Search ALL lists
    Search help
    Subscription info
Top Stories
Links
sHORTurl service
Tom Clothier's Archive
 Top Stories
Disease could hit Britain's trees hard

Ten of the best snowdrop cultivars

Plant protein database helps identify plant gene functions

Dendroclimatologists record history through trees

Potato beetle could be thwarted through gene manipulation

Hawaii expands coffee farm quarantine

Study explains flower petal loss

Unauthorized use of a plant doesn't invalidate it's patent

RSS story archive

Re: tetraploid


From: Vicki Craig <craigiris@earthlink.net>

Hi,

Sharon has done a wonderful explanation of tetraploids but I would like
to add some things. Pumila, the small iris which were crossed with the
tall bearded iris to produce standard dwarf bearded iris have two sets
of 8 chromosomes or 8-8-8-8. That makes pumila a tetraploid. Modern tall
bearded (those big beautiful things one sees in most all TB catalogs)are
also tetraploids having 2 sets of 12 chromosomes. i.e. 12-12-12-12. when
these two tetraploids are crossed they can produce an iris which has two
sets of chromosomes 8-8-12-12. These are not tetraploids. they are
called an amphi-diploid.  Somehow the mistaken notion of if you cross
two tetraploids of any count the results will be another tetraploid. Not
true.

Hope this helps clear this subject up. And yes even hybridizers who are
unfamiliar with the genetic make-up of different iris can err in their
terminology. Based on the background of Blue Chip Stock and without a
chromosome count I would place my money on it not being a tetraploid. 

Vicki

------------------------------------------------------------------------
Did you know that ONElist hosts some of the largest lists on the Internet?
http://www.ONElist.com
Our scaleable system is the most reliable free e-mail service on the Internet!





 © 1995-2015 Mallorn Computing, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
Our Privacy Statement
Other Mailing lists | Author Index | Date Index | Subject Index | Thread Index