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Re: tetraploid


From: "Jeff and Carolyn Walters" <jcwalters@bridgernet.com>

> From: Vicki Craig 
>  KEIRITH (Jean Witt 1997) is out of SUSAN BLISS I. 1922, a diploid TB,

Vicki,

The '39 Checklist gives the parentage of SUSAN BLISS as PHYLLIS BLISS X
DIADEM and the parentage of PHYLLIS BLISS as SWEET LAVENDER X MACRANTHA.
DIADEM and SWEET LAVENDER came from solid diploid ancestry, but MACRANTHA
was one of the 48-chromosome tetraploids collected in the Middle East in
the late 1800's. It is therefore unlikely that either PHYLLIS or SUSAN
BLISS were simple diploids.

> However you must bear in mind the fact that SNOW
> FLURRY was probably a doubling of two diploids which apparently was one
> of those 'freaks of nature'. Who knows, this could happen again.

SNOW FLURRY's parentage is PURISSIMA X THAIS. I believe THAIS was a
diploid, but PURISSIMA is a tetraploid (actually, a 47-chromosome aneuploid
according to chart of Randolph Chromosome Counts that Mike Lowe has made
available on the HIPS website).
PURISSIMA's parent's were ARGENTINA (50 chr.) and CONQUISTADOR (49 chr.).

I would think the probability of getting a tetraploid seedling from a cross
of two diploid parents would be vanishingly small. Perhaps Sharon Mc
Allister might have some insights here.

Jeff Walters in northern Utah  (USDA Zone 4/5, Sunset Zone 2)
jcwalters@bridgernet.com














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