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Re: AIS Registrations

Vince sez:

<<   Well, yes and no. While an iris from any country CAN be registered, it 
does not mean that they ARE. Registering an iris costs money, and if someone 
from France or Germany or East Timor has no intention of selling their intro 
in the
states, they won't bother.>>

In which case the names of their irises have no "legitimacy" according to the 
rules of the International Codes of plant nomenclature, which is a treaty 
sort of thing administered buy an international group which meets to consider 
these matters and has at least since the turn of the century. Different 
organizations oversee different genera. Just as AIS is the international 
registration authority for the genus Iris with the exception of the bulbous, 
so is RHS the international registration authority for the genus Lilium, and 
so forth. 

Simply because people do not choose to take advantage of the clear benefits 
of registering their iris with the international registration authority,  
does not mean that the system is not in place for them to do so.  

AIS is big on registering irises and down on unregistered irises and it has 
little to do with playing by their rules, or raising money, or awards, it has 
to do with keeping the nomenclature within the Genus straight, a duty they 
have been charged with by the govering authorities of the International 
Codes, and with minimizing the chance of confusion, for as we all know from 
life, where there is an ambiguity, there are those who will exploit it. 
Indeed, it is not unheard of for some to manufacture ambiguities that they 
may be exploited.

Anner, in Virginia

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