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Re: Please Skip My PH Question


Thanks to all who answered my PH question. I see I need more 
information about the type of Irises I have. Sorry also for
forgetting 
lime raises PH. That made for some confusion. I'll re-post the 
question when I know more details. 





--- In iris-talk@egroups.com, Bill Shear <wshear@e...> wrote:
> >I just recieved a bunch of Irises as a present. I was told they 
like
> >acidic soil but that I should not use lime to lower the PH. What 
then
> >should I use and how low should I try to make it (between 6 and 7 
or
> >lower).
> 
> Scott, before we can advise you we need more information: 1)
exactly 
what
> kind of irises do you have?  There are many distinct types, with 
equally
> distinct requirements.  The fact that "acidic soil" is mentioned,
as 
well
> as an aversion to lime, suggests they might be Japanese Irises.  2) 
Where
> do you live, and what is your USDA hardiness zone?  3) What is the 
pH of
> you soil now, without treatment?
> 
> That aside, you do have a fundamental error in your post--lime does 
not
> lower pH, but raises it (makes soil more alkaline).  To lower pH, 
you would
> need to incorporate acidic organic matter, such as oak leafmold, or 
use
> soil sulfur.
> 
> 
> Bill Shear
> Department of Biology
> Hampden-Sydney College
> Hampden-Sydney VA 23943
> (804)223-6172
> FAX (804)223-6374
> email<wshear@e...>
> Moderating e-lists:
> Coleus at http://www.egroups.com/community/coleus
> Opiliones at http://www.egroups.com/community/opiliones
> Myriapod at http://www.egroups.com/community/myriapod


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