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Re: Re: Anthocyanin-sidetracked


Yes, precisely.  It may turn out to be something like the pigment pathways. I. suaveolens may only have a partial pathway.  But that leaves it with defective plicata gene being at a particular locus. It is odd that Swertii being a plicata and my only getting at best 1/2 plicatas with suaveolens.  Even more so since I wasn't expecting any at all in the first generation.  Whatever it is it isn't 100% homozygous throughout the species.  Currently the species status of I. suaveolens involves a few color forms.  Certainly it could also involve variations of genes we can't even visually identify.  Fortunately ours are both diploid crosses and makes it a bit easier to untangle.

It would be interesting to know what the haft coloration on the falls is...AVI or anthocyanin.  I don't have suaveolens anymore, but have plans to replace it in the future.  A repeat of the cross might be in order.


Paul Archer
Indianapolis


-----Original Message-----
>From: irischapman@aim.com
>Sent: Aug 9, 2008 10:56 PM
>To: iris@hort.net
>Subject: [iris] Re: Anthocyanin-sidetracked
>
>I didn't realize or had forgotten that you had first generation  
>plicatas. I'll need to find the pics to have a look see.  How to 
>interpret this requirs a bit more exploration as suaveolens doesn't 
>show plicata pattern by itself.
>
>A number of glaciatas actually show anthocyanin in various ways. There 
>is a pattern with anthocynain  in lower epidermis but absent in  upper 
>epidermis , called Celstar.  The aphylla  cultivar White Mutant (has 
>been demonstrated to be a glaciata) shows a lot of anthocyanin  in bud 
>and can show some when opened. Fred Kerr has also noted glaciata 
>cultivars  with  anthcayanin. I would expect White Mutant to have AVI  
>and thus not fully repress  the anthocyanin which is extra strong with 
>AVI present. I wouldn't be suprised if that is also the situation with 
>Fred Kerr's seedlings.
>
>Chuck Chapman
>
>Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2008 09:58:30 -0500 (GMT-05:00)
>From: Paul Archer <pharcher@mindspring.com>
>Subject: Re: [iris] Re: Re: Anthocyanin-sidetracked
>
>OK.  Yours are second generation, my plicatas were first generation 
>plicatas.  Swertii X I suaveolens, about 1/2 plicatas.  Hard to say 
>since I didn't have many seedlings and wasn't worth repeating.  Even a 
>plant not showing plicata pattern may still carry it into the second 
>generation, especially since it is not apparent in I. suaveolens and 
>those that weren't highly resembled I. suaveolens in color distribution.
>
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