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Re: Re: HYB: Seed Germination

  • Subject: Re: Re: HYB: Seed Germination
  • From: Bill Chaney <billchaney@ymail.com>
  • Date: Thu, 19 Feb 2009 21:13:53 -0800 (PST)

I found a article in HortScience in 2006 that discussed using a strong base
(NaOH) to remove seed coats, but I doubt an acid like Pepsi or Coke would
work. The reference is below.  If anyone would like the full pdf of the
article, just contact me off list and I e-mail it to you.  

I think removal
of the water soluble germination inhibitors via any of the various methods
discussed should work well for most of the bearded iris.  Some species with
hard seedcoats could benefit from the procedure described in this article.
Bill (billchaney@ymail.com).


NaOH Scarification and Stratification Improve
Germination of Iris lactea var. chinensis Seed
Y.C. Sun, Y.J. Zhang1 and K.
Wang

Iris lactea seed is characterized mainly by physiological dormancy. Two
experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of NaOH treatment and
stratification on Iris seed germination. In Experiment 1, seeds were treated
with 14.38 M NaOH for 0 to 28 hours. In Experiment 2, NaOH treated and
nontreated seeds were stratified under 7 0C and moistened condition for 0 to
40 days. As results, NaOH treatment for 20 hours effectively removed seedcoat
and improved germination percentage from 0% to 56% compared to control (0
hours). However, germination percentage started to decrease after 20 hours.
Stratification for 40 days further improved germination percentage of NaOH
treated seeds to >80%, but did not affected seeds without NaOH treatment.
Results demonstrate that combination of NaOH treatment and stratification is
an effective practice to break Iris seed dormancy and improve germination
percentage.




________________________________
From: Linda Smith
<irisgrower@cableone.net>
To: iris@hort.net
Sent: Thursday, February 19, 2009
7:20:49 AM
Subject: Re: [iris] Re: HYB: Seed Germination

I've not been
successful yet w iris seed germination. But at our master
gardener's class
last night,
one of the things mentioned, was the use of Pepsi or coke as a
soaking
medium for hard seeds?

Anyone have thoughts on that? Still trying.
The speakers seemed to think coke would break into the toughest seeds.


Linda
in CW AZ
-------Original Message-------

From: christian foster
Date:
2/19/2009 7:20:53 AM
To: iris@hort.net
Subject: Re: [iris] Re: HYB: Seed
Germination

I didn't see this post from Mary Lou, I probably skimmed too
quickly.

>Mary
Lou, I didn't realize you were leaving your seeds in the
fridge for more
than
a year also!  Goodness, I feel like
I also soak and
squeeze replacement paper
towels whenever they start to shred.  Unlike
Christian, I don't replace them
when they are dirty, just when they get holes
in them.<

Anyway, I wanted to
comment.  The reason that I am now measuring
the amount of water I put into
my
burrito is because it seemed to me that some
seed groups were drowning and
rotting as opposed to leaching and germinating.
Now, this was not by any
means a scientific observation, but given the
significant increase in
germination rates this year I feel it is supported.
Many of the crosses
that
are germinating this year are the third or fourth
year that cross produced a
pod, so genetic factors are somewhat mitigated.
Also, busy-ness in the last
few weeks may add evidence that even freshly
germinated seed can survive
drying out before "pop-tart".  Have to wait until
May to do that body count,
though.

Christian
________________________________
From: Linda Mann
<lmann@lock-net.com>
To:
iris@hort.net
Sent: Tuesday, February 17, 2009
9:38:39 AM
Subject: [iris] Re:
HYB: Seed Germination

Mary Lou, I didn't
realize you were leaving your seeds
in the fridge for more than a year also!
Goodness, I feel like
I also soak and
squeeze replacement paper towels
whenever they start to shred.  Unlike
Christian, I don't replace them when
they are dirty, just when they get holes
in them.

<.. if you dry them out you
have to soak them... not just rinse
them. ...It seems the critical thing is
the leaching away part. Christian>
Amen!  Your comment gave me a good laugh
this AM.  Definitely a community of
the obsessed, and <great> to have a new
participant.

<Good Lord,
who but the
compulsively obsessed would think its
fun to look through bags of
hundereds of
seeds nearly every day to see if any
might have germinated! Glad
to be in good
company! :)....>

Fresh TB seeds
vary a <lot> in appearance from almost
square, big fat things to weasley
little immitation rat droppings, depending
in part on how many seeds were in
the pod (generally bigger if few seeds in a
full sized pod), genetics?,
weather during pod maturation? who knows what.
I've had at least two pods of
seeds germinate where my notes have said "seeds
all bad" because they were
so
small, irregular, and shriveled. When
refrigerated fresh, some stay plump,
black and shiny, others go slimy (I
haven't been paying as close attention
to
the slimy stage as Christian) almost
immediately, some look like they dry in
the damp baggie.  If you are referring
to the sequence I posted of potting
up
burrito'd seeds, those are the fat
black shiny kind.

<the pictures look like
my daylily seeds more than my iris
seeds???..D S>

FYI - first year
germination ranges from 30 to 100%.  I
haven't tried to keep up with number
of
germinants as well as I used to, other
than the first big wave.  Average %
germination seems to be steadily
increasing, seems to be closer to 50% now,
compared to starting out at around
3% with "nature's" way outdoor planting.
Like Christian, if growing and
blooming irises had been easy here, I would
<never> have started trying to
breed my own.  Love the flower, love the
challenge.
-- Linda Mann east
Tennessee USA zone 7/8
East Tennessee Iris
Society
<http://www.DiscoverET.org/etis>
Region 7, Kentucky-Tennessee
<http://www.aisregion7.org>
American Iris Society web site
<http://www.irises.org>
talk archives: <http://www.hort.net/lists/iris-talk/>
photos archives: <http://www.hort.net/lists/iris-photos/>
online R&I
<http://www.irisregister.com>
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