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Re: CULT: planting in pots

I planted over 100 new rhizomes in window box planters this  July with
full intentions of of leaving them in there until we sold the house and
moved.  Only problem was that we only sold the house on Halloween day so
getting them into my tiny garden was a virtual impossibility , not only
for the size of the lot and lack of garden space but due to the fact
that our new house construction will only be ready in April.  

Not willing to risk leaving them exposed to the elements , after
foolishly spending so much money on them , I decided to install some
fluorescent fixtures with cool white bulbs and bring them inside.  To my
surprise , they seem VERY happy down in the basement beside my wood
stove .  Many rhizomes are really increasing well under this light

When April comes , I'll throw all of the pots into the van and head up
the road and plant them directly into the ground , if weather permits.

Chris Darlington
Blainville Quebec
snow snow snow 

BigAlligator@aol.com wrote:
> In a message dated 12/5/00 2:21:23 PM Eastern Standard Time,
> patriciabrooks@coupeville.net writes:
> << Many of you have mentioned planting your more valuable iris in pots
>  when they first arrive.  That seems logical to move to sun when it
>  shifts or shelter from winds.  But doesn't that expose the plant more
>  to the weather in winter since the roots are closer to a surface?
>   >>
> Patricia,
>       Irises grown in pots are exposed more to extremes of temperature.  Most
> Irises are very cold hardy, but in cold winter climates, I would recommend
> the pots be grouped together and mulch be put around and between them.
>      I am one who grows Irises in containers all the time.  The Louisianas
> and Iris virginicas, pseudacorus, and tridentata are all in kiddie pools sunk
> into the ground.  This is to enable me to keep them moist enough to grow them
> here.  I grow my reblooming Tall Bearded Irises in pots too.  They have done
> fine so far in pots, but they tend to dwindle away if grown in the ground.
>       Lastly, I have some plants of what is probably Iris japonica, which is
> tender to cold.  I grow them in pots, so that I can pull them inside on
> nights like tonight, in which a horrific freeze is forecast.
> Mark A. Cook
> BigAlligator@aol.com
> Dunnellon, Florida      USDA Zone 8b

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