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Re: HYB: Pigments 101 -- "Final Exam"


I'm glad Sharon went to the trouble to send this post.  Now the muddle I was
making makes
more sense.

 >In practice, most hybridizers have already selected for a specific trait
and
>are working with stock for which earlier sets in the epistatic series have
>been stabilized.  Allele-based models are therefore not only appropriate
but
>much easier to use.

May I presume that line breeding leads to stock with more or less stable
traits
which then lend themselves to the simpler allele-based model as a practical
application even though the epistatic rules apply in a real sense?

>Now for the kicker:  Remember that it's quite possible to have two separate
>sets of alleles that control different chemical pathways with similar
effects
>in appearance.  We went into this in some detail when we were discussing
the
>dominant inhibitors found in TBs.

I have gathered that the chemical pathways are controlled differently in the
different
iris species, e.g. dwarf and aril species as opposed to the TBs.  So as a
result it has
been difficult to get a true pink arilbred, or is this off base?  But since
TBs are the
result of long years of hybridizing of different species, wouldn't they have
a lot of
built in epistatic surprises when you wouldn't expect one?  Just sitting
there waiting
for the right cross in order to put in an appearance?

Donald Eaves
donald@eastland.net
Texas Zone 7, USA


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