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CULT: humore and short stalks


When I see tall foliage and short bloom stalks in TBs, I always assume
they were hit by a hard freeze (low 20s F) after a warm spell (highs in
the 70s and 80s, lows in the 50s) about 2 months before blooming.  Well
before stalks are even thinking about showing.

Texas and Oklahoma are right in the pointy tip of all those sudden
arctic fronts that zoom to the south right when gardeners are getting
their hopes up for a good bloom season for a change.

The new leaves that form in the fan after those freezes (assuming the
damage to the plant wasn't severe enough to cause the whole thing to die
a wretched death) look normal.

So, maybe the humore makes for more lush growth that is more prone to
freeze damage, or maybe the damage would have been even worse without
the humore which seems to result in healthy happy leaves.  Anybody use
humore where they don't have these awful spring freezes?  Or have a
lucky spring in Texas/Oklahoma to compare results?

Just my two cents - since these irregular hard freezes cause so much
damage here most years, I tend to suspect that as a cause of all bad
things to irises <g>  The interesting thing about this stunting of
stalks from sudden severe cold after weeks of warmth, is that some
cultivars are highly sensitive to it and others seem to be completely
immune.  I've never seen a stunted pallida stalk, even tho bloom does
get frozen out some years entirely.

Linda Mann east Tennessee USA zone 7/8
aka Rot Queen



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