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Re: CULT: drought


--- Linda Mann <lmann@lock-net.com> wrote:

> After our recent near 3 inch rain, I see from the
drought map that we have
> moved "up" from 
> "exceptional" drought conditions.
> 
> Now we are only in "extreme" drought.
> 
> hooray?

Linda,

I rejoice in your good fortune! 

During the same period we received 0.60 inch of rain
in upstate South Carolina, and remain in the
"exceptional drought" category. There has been a
deficiency of precipitation in this area every month
this year since January, and the trend is not
encouraging: the % of normal precipitation that fell
from Jan.-Mar. was 77; from Apr.-Jun. it was 55; from
Jly.-Sep. it was 48; for Oct. & Nov. it was 34.
Restrictions on outside watering have been imposed.

Actually, the irises I shipped here from Utah and
planted in August and September have done very well.
They probably hardly notice that they have been moved,
since it has been as dry here since they arrived as it
normally is there. There is currently even a rebloom
stalk on Terry Aitken's MANY MAHALOS (IB, 2003) that
is showing color in the bud.

My greater concern is for all the plants typical of
this area (azaleas, gardenias, dogwoods, hydrangeas,
etc.) that are accustomed to more ample watering.

If you could see your way to do so, you might allow a
bit more of the precipitation to come on across the
mountains the next time through.

  
  

Jeff Walters
in upstate South Carolina
(USDA Zone 7b)


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