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Re: HYB: help - chilled seeds, germination


Thanks for the thoughts folks.

Outdoor temperatures for the next couple of months won't likely be in the range of reported temperatures for optimal germination of TBs (i.e., 50 to 60oF) for more than a few days here and there, so I wouldn't expect to see any germination outdoors till the "usual" time. [ignoring that we sometimes get a week in the middle of winter with highs in the 70s!]

However, the sunporch seems to have a really good temperature range for germination . Nights never below freezing, but often in the low 40s (i.e., temperature needed for chilling), days rarely above 60 this time of year. And if we do have any exceptionally warm sunny days that push temps above the mid-60s, I open the door between the sunporch and the house, where I've been mostly keeping the heat pump set at 64oF this winter, using the wood heater for supplemental heat.

In years past, after partial germination, I've put pots back outdoors for more chilling (and to free space on the sun porch), then brought them back in later in the winter to get a head start on outdoor germination.

These are <all> important crosses - fertile survivors of the great spring wipeout of 2007! ;-)

But not important enough to go the route of embryo culture...

Thanks again for the thoughts. Am inclining towards potting and putting outdoors for a bit of heavy watering and temp cycling while I make space on the sunporch for them.

Not quite in the mood for splitting seed batches for different treatments, but will think about it. Seems like there were two pods of one cross, so a lot of seeds in that one. They will probably have to go into multiple germination pots anyway, so might try more experimenting with that one.

--
Linda Mann east Tennessee USA zone 7/8
East Tennessee Iris Society <http://www.DiscoverET.org/etis>
Region 7, Kentucky-Tennessee <http://www.aisregion7.org>
American Iris Society web site <http://www.irises.org>
talk archives: <http://www.hort.net/lists/iris-talk/>
photos archives: <http://www.hort.net/lists/iris-photos/>
online R&I <http://www.irisregister.com>

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