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Re:WABASH and HELEN COLLINGWOOD


In a message dated 96-12-29 10:09:31 EST, you write:

<< Very interesting--did anything follow ELIZABETH NOBLE?  Guess I should
 find a list of Kenneth Smith's intros... >>

In response to your question, Dorothy, I must confess ignorance. Many years
ago, even before I joined AIS, I made crosses with ELIZABETH NOBLE which
resulted in few viable seeds, and rather retrogressive seedlings.  I want to
thank you for pointing out the pedigree, which I was unaware of, i.e. MME
MAURICE LASSAILLY X WABASH produced LOUISE BLAKE.  EXTRAVAGANZA X LOUISE
BLAKE produced HELEN COLLINGWOOD.  And HELEN COLLINGWOOD x Sdlg 9-62
(Extravaganza X Fort Ticonderoga) produced ELIZABETH NOBLE.  

Over the years I have heard many "old timers" say that WABASH was not much of
a parent, but the fact that it is a "grandparent" of HELEN COLLINGWOOD would
certainly belie that opinion.  I personally believe that HELEN COLLINGWOOD is
one of the very best garden irises ever!  

Interestingly, in the South at least, HELEN COLLINGWOOD is one of the few
irises to give Iris pallida a run for its money in the popularity
contest---you will find it in gardens in the most unexpected places, and
usually in abundance.  It seemingly thrives in great clumps without ever
being divided or moved.  And in beauty, few modern irises can even come
close.  A few years ago our Region 4 tour stop at the garden of JaNice and
Bill Mull in Norfolk, VA allowed us to see mass plantings of the great HELEN
COLLINGWOOD, a sight I will never forget.  Thanks again! I love this list
because of all the new things I learn on it!  Clarence Mahan in VA

 





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