hort.net Seasonal photo, (c) 2006 Christopher P. Lindsey, All Rights Reserved: do not copy
articles | gallery of plants | blog | tech blog | plant profiles | patents | mailing lists | top stories | links | shorturl service | tom clothier's archive0
 Navigation
Articles
Gallery of Plants
Blog
Tech Blog
Plant Profiles
Patents
Mailing Lists
    FAQ
    Netiquette
    Search ALL lists
    Search help
    Subscription info
Top Stories
Links
sHORTurl service
Tom Clothier's Archive
 Top Stories
Disease could hit Britain's trees hard

Ten of the best snowdrop cultivars

Plant protein database helps identify plant gene functions

Dendroclimatologists record history through trees

Potato beetle could be thwarted through gene manipulation

Hawaii expands coffee farm quarantine

Study explains flower petal loss

Unauthorized use of a plant doesn't invalidate it's patent

RSS story archive

Hello from Oklahoma


Hello to all,

Let me introduce myself since this is my first posting to the list.

I started growing iris six years ago and found it to be a new and very
interesting hobby.  Quite by chance, I found out there was a hybridizer
here in Oklahoma City and thought it would be interesting to visit his
little garden.  Paul Black's Mid America Garden was not the little
backyard that I expected.  There must have been 20,000 stalks of iris
close to peak bloom greeting my eyes.  I'm sure that was the day the
iris bug bit me.  I joined the Sooner State Iris Society and the AIS.

Now, I'm the president of the SSIS (250 members) and grow about 300
varieties of mostly bearded irises, although the Lousiana beds keep
getting bigger thanks to Perry Dyer.  There are about 300 seedlings from
some test crosses out back that should bloom this year.  Mostly
bushy-beard tests like Barry Blythe intros and Codicil, and some
arilbred tests.

I subscribed to the list in August and have enjoyed it ever since.  I
have found that iris-lovers, locally and now worldwide, to be the nicest
people I could hope to call friends.  

Greer Holland
irisdude@flash.net
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA Zone 6/7, where the wavin' wheat REALLY
DOES smell sweet when the wind comes right behind the rain.






 © 1995-2015 Mallorn Computing, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
Our Privacy Statement
Other Mailing lists | Author Index | Date Index | Subject Index | Thread Index