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Re: Wait One, Multiple Stalks???


Clarence wrote...

> Very few irises put out more than one stalk per rhizome, but it does happen,
> and certain cultivars are prone to this.  BEVERLY SILLS has often done this
> for me....in the years that it blooms.  EDITH WOLFORD has done it, but only
> a couple of times. Another that did this for me its first year was FEATURE
> ATTRACTION....which had, in one year, seven increases which all bloomed the
> same year right after the primary rhizome.

A fascinating trait. It is recessive and all iris that exhibit this
behavior can be traced back to Orville Fay's lines. He had wide
distribution on some of his seedlings, particularly some early tangerine
bearded blues.

Unfortunately, many hybridizers have only listed 'Fay sdlg' in their
pedigrees and it is impossible to accurately point to one area of Fay's
hybridizing that contains the multiple stalk locus.

It is significant that MARY RANDALL (Fay 51) appears numerous times in
multi-stalkers that have well documented backgrounds.

Of interest --some iris with low bud counts compensate for the lack of buds
by throwing multiple stalks.

Best regards,

Mike,  mikelowe@tricities.net   --   http://www.tricities.net/~mikelowe/
South Central Virginia, USA
USDA Zone 7A, pH-5.4,  very sandy loam
185 to 205 frost free growing days per year
Contemplating initiating construction on an ark.


Best regards,

Mike,  mikelowe@tricities.net   --   http://www.tricities.net/~mikelowe/
South Central Virginia, USA
USDA Zone 7A, pH-5.4,  very sandy loam
185 to 205 frost free growing days per year
Currently +12 inches of rain over yearly average and gaining every day!







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