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TB: Tall ones - It's in the Blood

  • To: Multiple recipients of list <iris-l@rt66.com>
  • Subject: TB: Tall ones - It's in the Blood
  • From: "Jeff and Carolyn Walters" <cwalters@digitalpla.net>
  • Date: Mon, 8 Dec 1997 20:03:46 -0700 (MST)

I wrote (5 Dec 97):

> Among the TB cultivars that have given me the tallest stalks have been
>      LADY MADONNA (Schreiners, 1984)  57"   (registration ht: 43")
>      CAPE IVORY (Innes, 1969)  52"   (registration ht: 38")
>      VICTORIA FALLS (Schreiners, 1977)  49"   (registration ht: 40") 
> (clip)
> If you are interested in the really old ones,  stalks of
> CONQUISTADOR (Mohr, 1923) reached a height of 5 feet (in California).

CONQUISTADOR is an ancestor of all three more recent iris named above. This
is less remarkable than it may seem, as CONQ is a grandparent of SNOW
FLURRY, and that cultivar was used so widely in hybridizing that it is
found in the ancestry of a vast number of modern iris. Still, could that
influence be felt down to the present among our taller iris? 
 
 Jeff Walters in northern Utah  (USDA Zone 4, Sunset Zone 2)
 cwalters@digitalpla.net
We had our first real snowstorm of the winter at valley level today. The
iris may have disappeared beneath their cozy, white blanket for the
duration. 





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