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Re: Poinsettias


On the other hand, the original posting was discussing a dog eating
poinsettia, not a child.  It is quite possible that various substances
can be toxic to one species and harmless, or nearly so, to others.  I
think I'll listen to the collection of vetrinarians and animal care texts
telling me that poinsettias can be harmful to my pets.  Although some
cats who eat these plants will show no symptoms, others may suffer from
drooling, diarrhea, vomiting, swelling inside and/or around the mouth, or
difficulty in breathing.  There are some indications that kidney damage
may also result.  Skin contact with the sap may also cause contact
dermatitis.  The most common symptoms of ingestion are irritation,
discomfort, rash, and stomach upset, along with head-shaking, salivation,
and pawing or rubbing at the mouth or eyes.  Nausea and vomiting may
occur if sufficient quantities are consumed. All species of animals are
susceptible, although the quantity needed to cause serious symptoms
varies greatly.  

In short, although the toxicity of poinsettias is much lower than once
suspected, the plants are not harmless.  It appears that calling them
harmless is also perpetuating a myth, just as is calling them deadly.

Lynn Woosley
Marietta, GA
USDA Zone 8

On Sat, 13 Dec 1997 22:32:21 -0700 (MST) "Albert F. Limberg"
<campconn@pacbell.net> writes:
>Let us put an end to this myth once and for all.
<snip>





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