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OT: Impatiens


     Do many of you all grow Impatiens?  I am not thinking of the New
Guinea Strain or the modern "Elfin" or "Imp"  (should be "Wimp") strains. 
I am thinking of the old-fashioned Sultanas.  The ones that are found in
old gardens in the south:  The ones that are often two feet tall.  
     For several years, I had wondered if these grand old plants still
existed.  The last time I had seen those was about 1975.  This year, I saw
some.  I saw them first growing under some of the trees at Rainbow Springs
State Park.  Last week, I found a place that still sells this strain of
Impatiens.  It is a Bait Shop here in Dunnellon.  Although the sign says
"Bait Shop", beside the bait shop building, under a Live Oak Tree, are some
potted plants for sale, mostly 50 cents for a gallon pot start.  There are
Hardy Begonias, Hydrangeas, Viburnums, Sultanas, Ferns, Pentas, African
Bleeding Hearts, Purple Hearts, and several others to be found there.  
     I found some of the Impatiens growing in some pots of African Bleeding
Heart (Clerodendron).  These Impatiens are now in pots to themselves so I
can nurse them through the winter, then plant them in the soil.  Come
spring, I know where to find this cherished type of Impatiens.

Mark A. Cook
billc@atlantic.net
Dunnellon, FL.  





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