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Re: What is a Species (was Re: Iris setosa)

  • To: Multiple recipients of list <iris-l@rt66.com>
  • Subject: Re: What is a Species (was Re: Iris setosa)
  • From: Curt Marble <cmarble@tiac.net>
  • Date: Mon, 22 Dec 1997 07:02:42 -0700 (MST)

Jim Wilson wrote:

>Among Siberians, would it make sense to recognize the
>28-chromosome, "robust" set as one species and the
>40-chromosome, "gracile" set as another?  That would
>correspond to what Lenz called the subseries level,
>but Mathews doesn't seem to talk about subseries.
>>From the point of view of an interested person, that
>level seems like a helpful one, whatever it's called.
>I'd like to see how it applies to the beardeds.
>                                        --Jim


I'm not sure if Jim meant to open the Siberian 28/40 versus
"robusta"/"gracilis" discussion as well as the species/subseries issue, but
why not?  I was recently at an iris (-people) gathering and brought up this
topic.  A couple ideas to ponder:
1) while somewhat awkward, the 28/40 nomenclature is accurate; 2)growing in
their native habitat, the 40-chromosome Siberians are quite robust; 3)there
is already an Iris robusta (hybrid of I virginica x I versicolor), so use of
that word would create confusion.

Hey, I just realized that I've spent too much time reading email,
considering that I haven't yet written a single Christmas card or letter to
anyone.  I think I will go "cold turkey" until after Christmas.  But before
I do, I wish all of you a wonderful holiday with warm memories, old and new.


---------
Kathy Marble <cmarble@tiac.net>
Harvard, MA
zone 5





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