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very early bloomers


I've already written to Anner about this, but I decided to go ahead 
and post this to the whole list as well...  even though some of you 
may think this is just a fantasy!  (It isn't.)

I got home from work yesterday and found that four of my irises are 
getting ready to bloom.  One is actually extending a bloomstalk 
upward; the other three are just beginning to poke bloomstalks up 
from among the foliage.  I'm guessing that this must be a freak 
result of el-Nino-weather.  The most advanced plant is Edith Wolford; 
the others are Planned Treasure, La Fortune, and Gypsy Woman.

All four are planted in the same area in my yard; my iris plants 
elsewhere in the yard are showing the effects of winter.  (I live in 
Portland, OR, by the way.)  I'm elated at the prospect of having some 
irises in January, but I'm worried that this might not be good for 
the plants.  

Any input appreciated!


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