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Re: SPEC: names


From: "Mark, Maureen" <MARKM@tc.gc.ca>

Thanks for that clarification, Bill.

I have noticed, but do not recall which, catalogues listing Huber irises --
the older ones, such as NOUVEL AGE and BELLE PROMESSE.  For his newer
varieties, you will have to contact Tony directly.  I have posted his
address previously so it can be found in the archives.

Maureen Mark
mailto:mmark@ottawa.com
Ottawa, Canada (zone 4)


> ----------
> From: 	Bill Shear[SMTP:BILLS@hsc.edu]
> Reply To: 	iris-talk@onelist.com
> Sent: 	Monday, December 21, 1998 10:55 AM
> To: 	iris-talk@onelist.com
> Subject: 	[iris-talk] Re: SPEC: names
> 
> From: Bill Shear <BILLS@hsc.edu>
> 
> 
> >They are both crosses of I. ensata and I. versicolor.  I believe that
> they
> >are the same -- just called differently by the hybridizers.  I suspect
> that
> >versata (and biversata) will become more common usage as Tony Huber's
> >crosses are gaining widespread recognition.
> 
> I think the terminology indicates that versatas are (versicolor x ensata)
> and that ensicolors are (ensata X versicolor).  Because of the possibility
> of maternal inheritance, this makes a great difference.  Biversatas are
> (versicolor x (versicolor x ensata)) or ((versicolor x ensata) x
> versicolor).  The few biversatas I have grown from seed appeared to be
> almost pure versicolor--not surprising since versicolor has been recorded
> as having up to 108 chromosomes (108, 105, 84 and 72 have been counted)
> and
> enstata has 24.  The ensata chromosomes get lost in the meiotic process,
> or
> certainly reduced to a small minority.
> 
> The pictures of Tony's irises are awesome.  Look at that branching from
> versicolor!  When and where and by whom are these being introduced?
> 
> Bill Shear
> Department of Biology
> Hampden-Sydney College
> Hampden-Sydney VA 23943
> (804)223-6172
> FAX (804)223-6374
> email<bills@hsc.edu>
> 
> 
> 
> 
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