hort.net Seasonal photo, (c) 2006 Christopher P. Lindsey, All Rights Reserved: do not copy
articles | gallery of plants | blog | tech blog | plant profiles | patents | mailing lists | top stories | links | shorturl service | tom clothier's archive0
Gallery of Plants
Tech Blog
Plant Profiles
Mailing Lists
    Search ALL lists
    Search help
    Subscription info
Top Stories
sHORTurl service
Tom Clothier's Archive
 Top Stories
Disease could hit Britain's trees hard

Ten of the best snowdrop cultivars

Plant protein database helps identify plant gene functions

Dendroclimatologists record history through trees

Potato beetle could be thwarted through gene manipulation

Hawaii expands coffee farm quarantine

Study explains flower petal loss

Unauthorized use of a plant doesn't invalidate it's patent

RSS story archive

OT: phonetic pronunciation

Linda wrote:

"Pronunciation varies a lot in this country - I have a hard time
understanding what plant some nursery people are describing also.  Not
only strange rules of pronunciation, but added or missing syllables."

This brings a local example to mind. Again not an Iris, but still a plant.
There is a regional trade in field dug Yuccas for landscaping here (a dying
trade, but not dead quite dead yet).  One of the species commonly sold is
Yucca thompsoniana. The Diggers, and thus the dealers they sell to, and
thus the customers have taken to calling them "Thomasony" or "Thomasoniana"
Yuccas (spelling provided by myself in a familiar English sort of way).
Makes me think of Thomas's Sony stereo set, or maybe that Thomas is a Sony,
or that he's sitting on a Sony!  Port old Thompson sort of gets displaced
by Thomas. [Maybe he is Thomas Thompson?].

Anyway, I've worked with the diggers (mostly Hispanic) enough to realize
that the problem is that many have Mexican Spanish as a native tongue, and
they can't say "thompsoniana" without getting their tongues tied into
knots, so it gets twisted into something close and more familiar to their
tongues - roughly "toe-mas-own-ee-ON-ah".

Sometimes, after they become familiar, such slightly off names show up in
publications, an actually become (sort of) official, though I haven't seen
it with the Yuccas yet.

I have seen Fameflower become Flameflower - two very different meanings.

OK, I've taken my turn at the dead horse.  Back to work.


To sign-off this list, send email to majordomo@hort.net with the

Other Mailing lists | Author Index | Date Index | Subject Index | Thread Index

 © 1995-2015 Mallorn Computing, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
Our Privacy Statement