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Private mail to Clarence Mahan (politics)

  • To: Multiple recipients of list <iris-l@rt66.com>
  • Subject: Private mail to Clarence Mahan (politics)
  • From: Croftway@aol.com
  • Date: Mon, 3 Feb 1997 11:48:41 -0700 (MST)

To all listers - apologies for sending this through the list, but AOL has got
it in for correspondence between Clarence and myself just now. Please
exercise your index finger on the DELETE key now.

 Clarence
  At this rate, my opinions will be out of date by the time you get to read
them!
 Snail mail is proving quicker and more reliable than AOL!! )-:
 
 Graham
 
 
 Here's what I've been trying to say:
 
 << 
  The problem here is slightly different. We have three main parties:
  
  Conservative (who will still get my vote) - traditionally from the right,
but drifting towards the centre (no bad thing). Main difficulty - party
leader (John Major) is competent, a good orator, but simply not charismatic
enough. This should not be a factor, but in the age of sound-bite TV
politics, it is. Also, having been in power for 18 years, there is a desire
for change amongst the populace - the grass is always greener..... I hate
change for change's sake.
  
  Labour - the so-called "New Labour". Still overshadowed by "Old Labour"
(militant tendency and the union power). Dominated by one man (Tony Blair)
and viewed by many to be a vehicle for him, and not a co-ordinated political
force. Traditionally from the left, now also drifting towards the centre, and
struggling not to be seen as poaching Conservative ideas (several times in
the last few weeks, Labour politicians have made policy statements only to be
derided by the Tories and the commentators for proposing the policies the
Tories have been carrying out for years - low taxation, reduced Govt.
spending, co-operation in a Europe of independent nations, etc.). Occasional
embarrassing statements by minor members of the Labour team who are part of
the "old school" show that Old Labour is alive and well.
  
  Liberal Democrats - traditionally in the centre, now feeling squeezed out
as the two bigger parties take their traditional territory. Seen as having
policies that lack teeth. Fronted by Europe's longest standing party leader
(Paddy Ashdown) who is seen as worn out. Has a problem at being seen and
heard. Strongest in local government, always shows poorly at national level.
May form alliance with Labour to form government after election, although
that is increasingly unlikely.
  
  Other factors:
  Nationalist Parties - Plyd Cymru and the SNP (nationalists for Wales and
Scotland respectively). SNP is strong at the moment and may take seats from
Labour in the north. This could be enough to prevent Labour winning a
majority in a close election.
  
  Referendum Party - there's always one single-issue party that is strong at
any election. Previously we've had the Green Party, but this year the
Referendum Party seems strongest. Fronted and funded by James Goldsmith,
multi-millionaire and father to equally wealthy (and attractive) Jemima
Goldsmith, wife of Imran Khan (former cricketer currently fighting election
for president in Pakistan). One policy - to hold a referendum on further
integration with Europe (which all the other parties are committed to anyway,
so it is really irrelevant). Really fighting against the Tories, so may get
enough seats to prevent them forming a majority.
  
  Monster Raving Loony Party. Fronted by "Lord" Sutch (not really a lord).
Britain's oldest and best loved mad party. Policies include - privatising
Prince Charles's ears, diverting the Channel Tunnel to the Falkland Islands,
and generally having a good laugh. Would get my vote but no candidate in this
constituency! )-;
  Maybe I could stand - it only costs #500 - any donations? If you get enough
votes, you get your money back!
  
  Apathy - if there was an apathy party, it would win every time. Likely to
show strongly this year as people are already fed up with the electioneering
- and the date of the election hasn't been set yet (last possible date - May
1)
  
  
  
  Well that's a summary of UK politics as I see them. I enjoy watching
political debate, and occasionally even get involved (at the
armchair-politics level!) - especially at home: I'm a Tory voter and Kate (my
much better half) is a Labour voter.
  
  
  
  Graham
   >>

Since I wrote this, Labour have spent the weekend churning out contradictory
statements (e.g. - "we recognise that Grammar Schools (a Tory pet) are
excellent schools, but we are opposed to them in principle" - say what?).
Also the UK Independence Party (a single issue group campaigning for a total
withdrawl from the EU) has released its manifesto - even more anti-EU that
James Goldsmith, but not likely to attract many votes.
More bulletins as events warrant!!


Best wishes

Graham
---------------------
Forwarded message:
Subj:    Re: UK politics - still trying to send it!
Date:    97-02-03 05:05:22 EST
From:    Croftway
To:      CEMahan


Clarence
Still trying - if this doesn't work, I'll try sending it through the list
(with an appropriate "private mail" subject heading).
At this rate, my opinions will be out of date by the time you get to read
them!
Might even snail mail them - could be quicker/more reliable than AOL! )-:

Graham


Here's what I've been trying to say:

<< 
 The problem here is slightly different. We have three main parties:
 
 Conservative (who will still get my vote) - traditionally from the right,
but drifting towards the centre (no bad thing). Main difficulty - party
leader (John Major) is competent, a good orator, but simply not charismatic
enough. This should not be a factor, but in the age of sound-bite TV
politics, it is. Also, having been in power for 18 years, there is a desire
for change amongst the populace - the grass is always greener..... I hate
change for change's sake.
 
 Labour - the so-called "New Labour". Still overshadowed by "Old Labour"
(militant tendency and the union power). Dominated by one man (Tony Blair)
and viewed by many to be a vehicle for him, and not a co-ordinated political
force. Traditionally from the left, now also drifting towards the centre, and
struggling not to be seen as poaching Conservative ideas (several times in
the last few weeks, Labour politicians have made policy statements only to be
derided by the Tories and the commentators for proposing the policies the
Tories have been carrying out for years - low taxation, reduced Govt.
spending, co-operation in a Europe of independent nations, etc.). Occasional
embarrassing statements by minor members of the Labour team who are part of
the "old school" show that Old Labour is alive and well.
 
 Liberal Democrats - traditionally in the centre, now feeling squeezed out as
the two bigger parties take their traditional territory. Seen as having
policies that lack teeth. Fronted by Europe's longest standing party leader
(Paddy Ashdown) who is seen as worn out. Has a problem at being seen and
heard. Strongest in local government, always shows poorly at national level.
May form alliance with Labour to form government after election, although
that is increasingly unlikely.
 
 Other factors:
 Nationalist Parties - Plyd Cymru and the SNP (nationalists for Wales and
Scotland respectively). SNP is strong at the moment and may take seats from
Labour in the north. This could be enough to prevent Labour winning a
majority in a close election.
 
 Referendum Party - there's always one single-issue party that is strong at
any election. Previously we've had the Green Party, but this year the
Referendum Party seems strongest. Fronted and funded by James Goldsmith,
multi-millionaire and father to equally wealthy (and attractive) Jemima
Goldsmith, wife of Imran Khan (former cricketer currently fighting election
for president in Pakistan). One policy - to hold a referendum on further
integration with Europe (which all the other parties are committed to anyway,
so it is really irrelevant). Really fighting against the Tories, so may get
enough seats to prevent them forming a majority.
 
 Monster Raving Loony Party. Fronted by "Lord" Sutch (not really a lord).
Britain's oldest and best loved mad party. Policies include - privatising
Prince Charles's ears, diverting the Channel Tunnel to the Falkland Islands,
and generally having a good laugh. Would get my vote but no candidate in this
constituency! )-;
 Maybe I could stand - it only costs #500 - any donations? If you get enough
votes, you get your money back!
 
 Apathy - if there was an apathy party, it would win every time. Likely to
show strongly this year as people are already fed up with the electioneering
- and the date of the election hasn't been set yet (last possible date - May
1)
 
 
 
 Well that's a summary of UK politics as I see them. I enjoy watching
political debate, and occasionally even get involved (at the
armchair-politics level!) - especially at home: I'm a Tory voter and Kate (my
much better half) is a Labour voter.
 
 
 
 Graham
  >>





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