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Re: Iris Breeding -- terminology

  • To: Multiple recipients of list <iris-l@rt66.com>
  • Subject: Re: Iris Breeding -- terminology
  • From: CEMahan@aol.com
  • Date: Mon, 10 Feb 1997 16:00:19 -0700 (MST)

In a message dated 97-02-10 15:09:38 EST, Sharon McAllister wrote:

<< Many years ago,  I remember running across a fascinating book entitled
 "Introgressive Hybridization" that analyzed the occurence of natural hybrids
 between iris species, but I don't recall the name of the author.  Perhaps
 someone else on the list will. >>

The book Introgressive Hybridization was written by the noted geneticist
Edgar Anderson, who was with the Missouri Botanical Garden and also Professor
of Botany at Washington University in St. Louis, MO.  The book was published
in 1949 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc, NY, and Chapman & Hall, Ltd., London. It
is one of the finest scientific studies ever done with irises as the
subject---and in this case it was the Hexagonae (Louisiana irises).  

I was fortunate enough to be able to acquire Lee W. Lenz's signed copy---and,
of course, Lenz himself was no slouch as a scientist who made major
contributions to the study of irises (especially the Californicae.) If you
ever have the chance to get Introgressive Hybridization buy it---forget the
price! Whatever it is, it will be worth it.  Clarence Mahan in VA





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