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Re: Japanese Beetles


Bill Shear wrote:
> 
> Interestingly, entomology texts tell us that the Japanese Beetle was
> imported to American from Japan "...on iris roots."


Bill--

Luckily, we don't have Japanese beetles here in this part of California,
but we do have a relative?  Our state ag people have identified it as a
"hoplia beetle"--looks very similar in color, but not as bright, and
kind of grayish-green in color.  Here in the foothills, we have only a
very very few of them, not enough to even be of a concern.  But only 25
miles away in the Central Valley, they can be quite a problem.  A lot of
our customers from that area complain about them.  Peculiarly, they say
the hoplia beetles have very favorite colors--they much prefer the white
or light color iris and leave the dark colors alone!!

Rick Tasco
Superstition Iris Gardens
Central California foothills--Zone 8





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