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Re: Alfalfa Tea


Walter A. Moores wrote:
> 
> >
> > I do have some comments about top dressing with alfalfa pellets. I did
> > it this last fall (before our rainy season - which passes for winter
> > here). A lot of them caught at the base of the fans and then at the
> > first rain the pellets swelled up about three fold. I don't know that it
> > would have been bad for the rhizomes to be covered that way, but it made
> > me nervous, so I scrapped it off the rhizomes. Since then, in our rain,
> > sun, rain, sun, rain, sun environment, the resultant mush gets a little
> > crusty as it dries out. Maybe it will break down as the weather clears.
> > In the future I think I will stick to tea if necessary and tilling
> > pellets in before planting (definitely).
> >
> >
>         I had the same experience mentioned above with alfalfa pellets.  I
> had also worked some of the pellets into the soil and when the rains came,
> the newly-set rhizomes were heaved out.  I think the trick in using
> alfalfa pellets is to work them into the soil in a new bed in the spring.
> Then, when you plant in the late summer or early fall, the pellets will
> have broken down.
> 
>         The tea idea sounds good.
> 
>         Walter Moores
>         Enid Lake, MS

Walter,

The trick to working Alfalfa Pellets into the soil is to first lay them
out on top of the soil and wet them down with a hose.  Do this when it
is warm during the summer.  In a few hours they will deteriorate into
fine crumbles which can be tilled or turned in easily.  No waiting!  

Rick Tasco
Central California
Zone 8





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