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More on Manure

Graham Spencer wrote:

:   I would add that it is
:   important to note what type of bedding material is mixed with the manure. We
:   have manure from a local stables that uses wood shavings on the floor
:   of straw, and, if left to compost for six months before use, gives a lovely
:   friable soil improver that all herbaceous plants (esp. siberians) love. 

Bedding material??  Floor???    I was thinking in terms of corrals, where the
only thing it gets mixed with is native soil!  

:    We've
:   also used it under TBs, added one month prior to planting.
:   Take care, as straw and wood shaving can both steal nitrogen - the microbes
:   that are rotting them down take it and keep it from your plants. Fresh
:   contains urine, which is very high in nitrogen.

Fresh manure is also VERY unpleasant to work with -- while aged manure is dry,
crumbling, and almost odorless.  A good test as to whether a manure pile has
aged enough for use in iris beds is how YOU feel about picking up a piece and
crushing it in your bare hand.  

Seriously, Graham --  thanks for adding the appropriate words of advice for
those living in more civilized parts of the world where horses are housed in
enclosed stables. 

Sharon McAllister (73372.1745@compuserve.com)
Obviously living in the still-wild west.

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