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Kentucky vs. New York:

  • To: Multiple recipients of list <iris-l@rt66.com>
  • Subject: Kentucky vs. New York:
  • From: "Michael Cook" <macook@iglou.com>
  • Date: Tue, 25 Feb 1997 17:10:00 -0700 (MST)

Dear Robins, 
     I was interested in the letters from people in colder climates
concerning the lack of rot in their Irises.  This reminds me of an
interesting fact.  One lady I do some yard work for lives here most of the
time, buts she lives in Chautauqua, New York from mid-May to late-August. 
When I divided some Irises several years ago, she took some extras I gave
her and planted them in New York.  That way, she gets to see Irises here
then gets a replay in New York.    
     What interested me in this is that she has yet to have one Iris to rot
in New York, but several have had to be "doctored" here to save them.  The
Irises in question range from historics through the early 1990's.  Cold
climates must have less rot because the cold temperatures hamper the
Erwinia bacterium.  Here in Kentucky, it is frequently warm enough for
Erwinia activity, but too cold for the Iris to grow.  This makes it a
sitting duck.  

Mark A. Cook
Lexington, KY.    Zone 5/6
Sunny, near 50 today.  Crocuses and Lungwort blooming.   

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