hort.net Seasonal photo, (c) 2006 Christopher P. Lindsey, All Rights Reserved: do not copy
articles | gallery of plants | blog | tech blog | plant profiles | patents | mailing lists | top stories | links | shorturl service | tom clothier's archive0
 Navigation
Articles
Gallery of Plants
Blog
Tech Blog
Plant Profiles
Patents
Mailing Lists
    FAQ
    Netiquette
    Search ALL lists
    Search help
    Subscription info
Top Stories
Links
sHORTurl service
Tom Clothier's Archive
 Top Stories
Disease could hit Britain's trees hard

Ten of the best snowdrop cultivars

Plant protein database helps identify plant gene functions

Dendroclimatologists record history through trees

Potato beetle could be thwarted through gene manipulation

Hawaii expands coffee farm quarantine

Study explains flower petal loss

Unauthorized use of a plant doesn't invalidate it's patent

RSS story archive

RE: CULT: Leaf Spot-Boron

  • To: Multiple recipients of list <iris-l@rt66.com>
  • Subject: RE: CULT: Leaf Spot-Boron
  • From: "J.F. Hensler" <hensler@povn.com>
  • Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 12:34:50 -0700 (MST)

Hi,

Bill Shear wrote:
According to the texts, boron is involved in how plants use calcium....

If this is correct, could a possible calcium deficiency exist?

The description of "black necrosis" sounds a lot like  the way I used to =
describe my tomato fruits (blossom end rot) before adding calcium to the =
soil.

Soil tests done here showed a a definite need. The results of adding =
calcium have been obvious not only in the orchard and the veggie garden, =
but we've had a real decline of problems in ornamentals.

Just a thought.....

Christy Hensler


THE ROCK GARDEN
Newport, WA
http://www.povn.com/rock/







 © 1995-2015 Mallorn Computing, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
Our Privacy Statement
Other Mailing lists | Author Index | Date Index | Subject Index | Thread Index