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Re: SPURIAS


Mark,

I have a small spuria iris bed here at my home on Isle of Palms, S.C.  
They do very well for me and bloom mid to late April usually.  Their color
range and bloom I think is especially attractive.  Their foliage is lovely,
similar
to Siberian but the foliage is over 32 to 36 inches here.  Their foliage does
go
dormant late summer, then starts up again in the fall.  Good luck with your
spuria iris.  A number of Region  V irisarians grow spurias.

Claire 235, Isle of Palms, S.C. where I have had an iris to bring in most of
the winter.  I have a clump blooming out of sequence and it is not a
rebloomer.  I hope to identify it when I have a chance to check some of
my old records, a tall bearded similar to some of Dave Niswonger's Halo
series. 





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